healthy nutrition

This is why peeled hemp seeds are healthy! Nutritional values ​​and effects at a glance

The hemp hearts (or in English Hemp hearts) are the soft inner part of the hemp seeds that is left over after the outer shell has been removed. The tiny cream-colored and green-colored seeds are sometimes called peeled hemp seeds designated. The hemp seeds come from the Cannabis sativa L. plant. But in contrast to some other products of the cannabis plant, the peeled hemp seeds show hardly any measurable levels of the psychoactive substance THC (less than 0.2%).

The plant is native to Central Asia, where the hemp seeds have been used by humans for thousands of years. Today you can find peeled hemp seeds all over the world. They are loved for their versatility, nutty taste, and healthy benefits. In the following we reveal why hemp seeds are healthy and what they are good for.

Hemp seeds nutritional values

Peeled hemp seeds have a nutty taste

30 grams of peeled hemp seeds (about 3 tablespoons) contain:

Calories: 166 kcal

Fat: 14.6 g

Sodium: 1.5 mg

Carbohydrates: 2.6 g

Dietary fiber: 1.2 g

Sugar: 0.5 g

Protein: 9.5 g

carbohydrates

A serving of hemp hearts is relatively high in calories but low in carbohydrates. 30 g of hemp hearts (3 tablespoons) have 166 calories but only 2.6 grams of carbohydrates. Almost half of the carbohydrates (around 1.2 grams) come from fiber. Only half a gram of the carbohydrates come from sugar and the rest from starch.

Peeled hemp seeds are a low glycemic food, with the glycemic load estimated at 0 in a single 3 tablespoon serving.

Fats

Hemp seeds score with healthy fats. 30 grams contain an impressive 15 g of fats, of which 1.4 g are saturated, 1.6 g are monounsaturated and 11.4 g are polyunsaturated (omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids). That’s more of the good fats than you can find in a similar serving of chia or flax seeds. Since hemp seeds are of plant origin, they are also cholesterol free.

Peeled hemp seeds have a high protein content

protein

These tiny seeds are a real vegetable protein bomb. 3 tablespoons contain almost 10 grams of protein, about twice as much as a similar serving of flaxseed or chia seeds (about 5 grams each).

Hemp seeds also contain all nine essential amino acids, which are well absorbed and metabolized by the body.

In general, animal sources of protein such as eggs, milk, and whey have a Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score (PDCAA) index of 1.00, which means they are digested well. Vegetable protein sources are typically lower. Soy leads the plant category with a PDCAA value close to 1.00, followed by beans and legumes (value from 0.6 to 0.7) and seeds and nuts (0.4 to 0.5). Hemp seeds are assigned a protein digestibility of 0.63 to 0.66.

Vitamins and minerals

Peeled hemp seeds are not only rich in healthy fats and protein, but also in many nutrients. Hemp is an excellent source of magnesium, providing around 210 mg, or around 50% of your daily needs. A serving of semen also provides 13% of the daily iron requirement for adults (2.4 mg). Hemp seeds are also a good source of zinc, providing around 3 mg per serving, or around 20% of your daily requirement.

Benefits for our health

Hemp seeds are good for heart health

When you include this superfood in your diet, you can reap the health benefits of the seeds. Many research studies examining the benefits of hemp have been conducted on animals. Further research in humans is needed.

Improved heart health

Like other seeds (and nuts), hemp seeds are heart-healthy. Studies have shown that they are high in both omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids. A healthy intake of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids is critical to preventing, relieving, or curing many diseases, including cardiovascular disease.

The authors of one research report concluded that there was enough evidence to support the hypothesis that hemp seeds have the potential to positively affect heart disease, but they added that more research is needed.

Make energy balls yourself with peeled hemp seeds

Reduced risk of type 2 diabetes

Hemp seeds also provide a healthy dose of magnesium, which is needed by the body to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. According to the National Institutes of Health, magnesium helps the body use blood sugar and could thus help reduce the risk of insulin resistance – a disease that can lead to diabetes.

Stronger bones

Magnesium is also important for building bones. People with a higher intake of magnesium have higher bone mineral density, which is important in reducing the risk of fractures and treating osteoporosis. And studies have shown that having adequate levels of magnesium in the body is important for maintaining healthy bones.

Ingredients for a healthy green smoothie

Relief from constipation

Due to their high fiber content, hemp seeds can help relieve constipation. Researchers have found that increasing fiber intake helps increase bowel frequency in patients with constipation.

Preliminary research has also shown that hemp seeds can help with constipation. One animal study found that taking hemp seed soft capsules helped relieve constipation. However, more research needs to be done to understand the full benefit to humans.

Improved cognitive function

Another animal study was conducted on the potential benefits of hemp seeds in terms of memory and neuroinflammation. The researchers found that the hemp seed extract prevented the learning and memory damage from inflammation and improved the damage from induced inflammation in the hippocampus. Another study also showed that hemp extracts had effects on blood flow in the human brain.

Hemp seed allergy

unpeeled hemp seeds in a bowl

Allergic reactions to Cannabis sativa have been reported, although many studies examine the part of the plant that is used for marijuana consumption (not hemp seeds). There have been reports of sore throats, nasal congestion, rhinitis, pharyngitis, wheezing, and other problems including anaphylactic reactions. There were also reports of workers processing hemp fiber in a textile mill with significantly higher prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases.

Recent reports of hemp seed allergies are absent, but the possibility should not be ruled out.

Side effects

Hemp seeds as a food or oil do not make you high

When hemp seeds are consumed as food, they are generally considered safe. Many people wonder if consuming cannabis seeds will get them high. But that probably won’t happen. Although marijuana and hemp seeds are related (they come from the same cannabis plant family), they are very different.

Hemp seeds do not naturally contain significant amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive substance. In fact, hemp seed products to eat or ingest must contain less than 0.3 percent THC. However, studies have found that they may not be completely free of this compound.

A study conducted in Canada found differences in the THC content of hemp seed products, with some rated brands containing amounts higher than the legal threshold. The researchers suggested that the higher levels could be due to contamination during processing.

If you are taking certain medications, including estrogens, ACE inhibitors, or antihypertensive drugs, talk to your doctor before eating hemp seeds.

Hemp seeds are naturally gluten-free, but can be exposed to cross-contamination, e.g. if the seeds are “contaminated” by a cereal containing gluten. So if you are on a gluten-free diet, you should look for brands that are certified gluten-free.

Hemp seed alternatives

Hemp seeds peeled with oat flakes, almonds and cashew nuts

Peeled hemp seeds are available all year round in many health food stores or health food stores. But hemp is often harvested in the fall. Other derivatives of hemp seeds are also found, including protein powder, soft capsules, oil, and hemp flour.

Many people wonder where the hemp seeds compare to other seeds like flax and chia seeds. All of these seeds – chia, flax, and hemp – are great sources of plant-based protein and fiber. However, they differ in their nutritional values. Hemp seeds contain 10 grams of protein per 30 g, while chia and flax only provide 5 grams.

At 12 grams per 30 g, hemp seeds also have more omega fatty acids as flax and chia seeds with 9 and 7 grams respectively. Hemp seeds also contain an anti-inflammatory omega fatty acid – gamma linolenic acid (GLA) – which flax seeds and chia seeds do not offer.

Shelf life and storage

Shelf life and storage of hemp seeds and hemp protein powder

Peeled hemp seeds can spoil fairly easily, but they can last for a year if properly stored. Packages of peeled hemp seeds should be stored in a cool, dry place or at cooler temperatures. The best way to prevent spoilage is to store the hemp seeds in a sealed container in the refrigerator. If kept in a pantry, they will only last 3 to 4 months. You can also put the seeds in zipper bags and store them in the freezer. The cannabis seeds are bad if they have a rancid odor.

How to use the cannabis seeds

Make milk yourself from peeled hemp seeds

Peeled hemp seeds can be used in a variety of ways. For example, you can make hemp milk yourself by mixing the finely ground seeds with water in a blender and then straining off the residues. Ground seeds can be used to make flour or vegan protein powder. Some people extract the oil from the seeds and use it in dressings and sauces.

Make hemp milk yourself with hemp seeds and water

With hemp seeds you can refine many drinks, dishes and desserts and give them additional protein power. They add texture, a little crunch, and a subtle, nutty taste.

Here are a few easy ways to use hemp seeds, hemp milk, or hemp oil:

  • Prepare a green smoothie with banana, spinach, blueberries, almond milk and a dash of maple syrup. Put the seeds straight into the blender or sprinkle the seeds over the smoothie at the end. In this detox plan you will find many great smoothie recipes with hemp seeds!
  • Use hemp milk to make other smoothies with ingredients like peanut butter, bananas, or avocado.
  • Use hemp milk to make your morning latte.
  • Use hemp seeds to make a cheesecake crust. First grind them in a food processor to get the right consistency, then press them into a cake pan.

Spaghetti with green pesto with peeled hemp seeds

  • Add hemp seeds to the pesto. Check out this article for a simple recipe for a hemp seed green pesto.
  • Prepare a fresh, citrus-like salad dressing with hemp oil, fresh lemon juice, lemon zest, salt, pepper and chopped garlic.
  • If you’re making a jar of yogurt dessert, add peeled hemp seeds between the layers of fruit and yogurt. Then sprinkle a pinch or two of hemp hearts over the dessert at the end.
  • Roast the hemp seeds and use as a fish or chicken coat before baking or sprinkle over avocado toast.
  • Make energy bites or protein bars with peeled hemp seeds to satisfy afternoon cravings. Simply add 45g of hemp protein powder or ground hemp seeds to your favorite recipe to add 14 grams of protein to the snack.
  • Upgrade your breakfast cereal or porridge! If you make your own crunchy cereal at home, you can also combine the ingredients as you wish.

Sprinkle the hemp seeds and chia seeds over a green smoothie

credentials:

The cardiac and hemostatic effects of dietary hempseed“- Dolphin Rodriguez-Leyva & Grant N Pierce

Effects of Hemp seed soft capsule on colonic ion transport in rats“- Xiao-Fang Lu, Meng-Di Jia, Sheng-Sheng Zhang, Lu-Qing Zhao

“Hemp Seed Phenylpropionamides Composition and Effects on Memory Dysfunction and Biomarkers of Neuroinflammation Induced by Lipopolysaccharide in Mice “- Yuefang Zhou, Shanshan Wang, Jianbo Ji, Hongxiang Lou, and Peihong Fan